A Cocktail Fit for a Quarterly

The essence of connoisseurship is simplicity, and I’m talking about the kind that’s born from respect rather than resignation. Taste is all about knowing how to spot and, then, how to avoid hyperbole. It manifests as a disdain for the overwrought and inauthentic and, sometimes, as a quest for its

NDQ has Reopened Submissions!

It is with a good bit of excitement that we announce that North Dakota Quarterly has reopened submission for fiction, poetry, and non-fiction for a volume to be published this fall. As part of this process, we’ve revised our submission guidelines to reflect the changing character of the board and, we

Davida Font and NDQ

One of the most enduring and perhaps endearing characteristics of North Dakota Quarterly has been its use of Davida font in its iconic logo “NDQ”:     The fonts used on the NDQ title page and masthead have not changed frequently. The first series of the journal used an attractive old style serifed

The Dog Park at the End of the Universe

Over the last few months, I’ve been contributing some short essays on small town life from North Dakota Quarterly’s back yard in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Here’s one, In Praise of Trucks, and another, Alone Together in a Small Town, and another, Bump outs, Logistics, and Citizenship in a Small Town. I pretend that

What books would you ban for Banned Book Week?

The last week of September is Banned Books Week and the good folks at the American Library Association bring attention to banned and challenged books! It’s a great cause and one that deserves to be taken seriously. Of course, like all serious things, it deserves to be poked at a

The Cats of St. Nicholas

The last few months at North Dakota Quarterly have been a flurry of activity. We’re preparing a volume for publication, we have a new publisher, we’ve moved offices, and I’m learning the ropes as the new editor.  I’ve been incredibly fortunate to have the former managing editor Kate Sweney around to guide me,

Is Shakespeare Still Relevant?

Our friends over at the Institute for Philosophy in Public Life have a conversation with Adam Kitzes on whether Shakespeare is relevant today. Adam is not only a scholar of Shakespeare at the University of North Dakota, but also a member of the NDQ editorial board (and a sometime contributor to

On Bump Outs, Logistics, and Citizenship in a Small Town

Over the last few months, I’ve been contributing some short essays on small town life from North Dakota Quarterly’s back yard in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Here’s one, In Praise of Trucks, and another, Alone Together in a Small Town. Maybe someday, I’ll write a little book or something.  – Bill Caraher,

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